Navigation

Fire highlights risks of energy storage

Arizona Public Service via AP

This photo taken in May 2017 shows the Festival Ranch 2-megawatt battery owned by Arizona Public Service near Buckeye, Ariz.

The Associated Press PHOENIX (AP) — Arizona’s largest electric company installed massive batteries near neighborhoods with a large number of solar panels, hoping to capture some of the energy from the afternoon sun to use after dark.

Arizona Public Service has been an early adopter of battery storage technology seen as critical for the wider deployment of renewable energy and for a more resilient power grid.

But an April fire and explosion at a massive battery west of Phoenix that sent eight firefighters and a police officer to the hospital highlighted the challenges and risks that can arise as utilities prepare for the exponential growth of the technology.

With an investigation ongoing and no public word on the fire’s cause, the incident is being closely watched by energy storage researchers and advocates.

“This is getting attention, and I think everyone realizes that too many safety incidents ... will be detrimental going forward,” said George Crabtree, director of the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, a partnership of national laboratories, universities and companies funded by the U.S. Energy Department. “So I think it’s being taken very seriously.”

APS has assembled a team of engineers, safety experts and first responders to work with the utility, battery-maker Fluence and others to carefully remove and inspect the 378 modules that comprise the McMicken battery system and figure out what happened.

APS installed the 2-megawatt battery systems at a substation in Surprise, outside Phoenix, in 2017 and another near the Festival Ranch development in nearby Buckeye. They help the utility manage fluctuations from clouds or the setting sun in areas with a large number of rooftop solar panels.

Those batteries are tiny in comparison to the 850 megawatts that APS has pledged to build by 2025. Energy storage, and batteries in particular, are projected to take off as renewable energy prices come down and states mandate a growing share of power must come from renewables like wind and solar, which are subject to the whims of Mother Nature.

On the current electric grid, energy is used as it’s generated; the supply and demand must match, or customers will face blackouts or power surges.

At times, California produces so much solar energy that its utilities pay APS to take it off the grid. New solar farms are planned in Arizona and elsewhere in the West. Storing energy allows utilities to better manage peaks and valleys.

“Absent battery storage, the whole value proposition of intermittent renewable energy makes no sense at all,” said Donald Sadoway, a researcher at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and cofounder of battery storage company Ambri. “People just don’t understand that the battery will do for electricity what refrigeration did to our food supply.”Speech

Click to play

0:00/-:--

+ -

Generating speech. Please wait...

Become a Premium Member to use this service.

Become a Premium Member to use this service.

Offline error: please try again.